Spicy Korean Chicken Wings

What I love most about these wings is their crispy exterior followed by juicy interior, without ever having to fry them. The secret is in the baking powder and salt coating while sitting in the fridge all day. Add that to a layer of smoke followed by a spicy Korean sauce, and they’re simply amazing. If you don’t have a smoker, a bbq on indirect at 300°F or even an oven would work just fine for these.

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Sous Vide Oreo Cheesecake

I’ve made these delicious little jars a number of ways over the last six months. I first added pumpkin to them, with gingersnap crusts. Then I did mint chocolate, New York with graham cracker crust and strawberries, and finally today this Oreo version. Each version has been simple, easy, and gone in minutes.

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Basic Vinaigrette

This is the first in a series of basic videos on how to make your own vinaigrette salad dressing at home. The basics are simple: combine 1 part acid (balsamic vinegar, white wine vinegar, cider vinegar, etc) with 1/3 part emulsifier (mustard, honey, mayonnaise, egg yolk), slowly whisk in 3 parts oil, then finish with any final ingredients such as shallots, blue cheese, fresh herbs, or crushed nuts.

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Gluten free blackberry peach crumble

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Sous Vide Quiche Cups

Starbucks Sous Vide Egg Bites, move over, the new Queen of breakfast is here. Ok, I really don’t know the sex of custardy egg dishes, but these certainly taste like they’re fit for a queen. Creamy egg filled with savory bacon, caramelized shallots, and delicious gruyere cheese? Yes, please! Even better, you can whip up a dozen of these jars with as little as a half hour of work (with unattended time for cooling and cooking), and they keep in the fridge for up to two weeks!

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Bananas Flambe

Cooking with fire is fun, as long as you’re careful. It impresses guests, it adds great flavor, and you get to light stuff on fire! This recipe is simple, the key steps being making sure to coat the spices in butter before adding the alcohol, turning the flame off before adding alcohol, then letting the alcohol heat up for 5 seconds, and lighting the edge of the pan with either the stove flame or a long match or bbq igniter. Feel free to try peaches flambe, substitute nutmeg and clove for the ginger and cardamom, even use spiced rum instead of dark rum and amaretto. It’s very versatile, and how can you go wrong with fruit, butter, spices, and alcohol?

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Technique: Flambé

This is the first in an ongoing series of technique videos I’ll be posting, giving short tips and important details on everything from (obviously) flambéing to broiling to marinating. The accompanying recipe, in this case bananas flambé, will be posted two days after the original technique video. Consider this a teaser, and a good video to watch if you ever want to try a flambé recipe of your own.

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Roasted Green Beans with Parmesan

Roasted Green Beans

Roasted Green Beans with Garlic and Parmesean

In the last year, I’ve become a huge fan of roasting vegetables. The high heat and subsequent browning gives the vegetables more flavor, and they become delicious with almost no other additions. The roasted broccoli with chili and garlic, for example, or oven roasted tomatoes, let me cook healthy and simply but still keep a ton of flavor. This roasted green bean dish is another example, and one that I hope will enter your regular cooking rotation the way it has mine.

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Pumpkin Roll

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Mmmm pumpkin. Like many others out there, I eagerly await Fall and the return of pumpkin spice lattes, pumpkin pancakes, and … these amazing pumpkin rolls. When I took one to the in-laws for Thanksgiving last year, I was told I wouldn’t be allowed back without it in future years. With a cream cheese frosting center and layers of pumpkin sponge cake topped with even MORE frosting and a dusting of pumpkin pie spice? Yes, it IS just that good.

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Sous Vide Primer

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This post is for all of those who got a new immersion circulator for Christmas, or just took advantage of the many sales leading up to it.

For those new to the idea, Sous Vide is a revolutionary new(ish) cooking method that has been in use at high-end restaurants for many years, but is just starting to enter the home market. The basic idea is to seal your food in a vacuum sealed or ziplock bag and place it in a water bath kept at a consistent temperature by an immersion circulator. There are a number of benefits to this method of cooking. First, it’s incredibly easy and forgiving, simple enough for even the most basic cook. You just set the temperature and walk away. If you accidentally cook your chicken breast for a two hours instead of an hour and a half? No big deal, it’ll just be a little more tender. Since the water bath is the temperature you want your food cooked to, it (mostly) can’t overcook. If you leave it cooking for far too long, the worst that’ll happen is that it gets TOO soft. The second benefit is extremely moist, tender food. Since the higher the temperature you cook meat to, the more moisture is lost, this method results in very juicy meat. The possibility of cooking for extremely long periods of time means you can take very tough pieces of meat such as pork shoulder and short ribs and cook them for 48-72 hours, resulting in extremely tender meat. So with sous vide, you get a simple, hands-off approach to cooking that gives you some of the most moist, tender meat you’ve ever had. What’s not to love about that?

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