Sous Vide Pork Tenderloin

Sous Vide Pork Tenderloin

 

I know I’m beginning to sound like a broken record, but sous vide is amazing. This pork tenderloin, first brined for six hours then cooked sous vide with rosemary and thyme, is absolutely amazing. It’s simple, low work, and absolutely delicious. The key is getting a good sear in an extremely hot pan, to give it that rich, full flavor and beautiful crust.

The first step is the brine. This is important… the salt will add moisture to the pork, the honey will help caramelization when you sear the pork, as well as adding a little extra sweetness to the dish. The herbs and spices also help by adding additional flavor. Start by bringing the water, salt, honey, bay leaves, thyme, rosemary, crushed garlic, and black peppercorns to a boil. Boil for one minute, then turn off the heat. Let sit until cool.

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Pour the cooled brine into a container with the pork, ensuring that the pork is completely submerged, and let sit in the refrigerator for 6 hours.

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Remove the pork from the brine, rinse well and remove any peppercorns or herbs embedded in the tenderloin, then place in a zip-lock or vacuum bag along with the olive oil. Remove the remaining thyme and rosemary from their stems, add to the sous vide bags, and rub around with the olive oil to evenly coat the pork tenderloins. Seal bags via vacuum sealer or water displacement technique.

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Place bags in a sous vide water bath at 135°F for 3 hours.

 

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Pat the pork tenderloin dry and brush off the majority of the herbs. Heat a skillet over high heat until the vegetable oil starts to shimmer and just barely smoke, then add the pork tenderloin, laying it into the pan away from you to prevent painful spatters. Let the pork sit until it easily moves (it will release naturally when a good sear has formed), then flip it and repeat.

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Once you’ve seared all sides of the meat, transfer it to a platter, cover with foil, and rest for 10 minutes before slicing and serving.

Sous Vide Pork Tenderloin

Sous Vide Pork Tenderloin
 
Author:
Recipe type: Entree
Ingredients
  • 8 cups water
  • ⅓ cup honey
  • 5 oz. (1 cup) kosher salt
  • 12 bay leaves
  • 6 large rosemary sprigs
  • 1 bunch thyme
  • ½ cup garlic cloves, crushed, skin left on
  • 2 tablespoons black peppercorns
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
Instructions
  1. Start by bringing the water, salt, honey, bay leaves, crushed garlic, black peppercorns, and half each of the thyme and rosemary, and to a boil. Boil for one minute, then turn off the heat. Let sit until cool.
  2. Pour the cooled brine into a container with the pork, ensuring that the pork is completely submerged, and place in the refrigerator for 4-6 hours.
  3. Remove the pork from the brine, rinse well and remove any peppercorns or herbs embedded in the tenderloin, then place in a zip-lock or vacuum bag along with the olive oil. Remove the remaining thyme and rosemary from their stems, add to the sous vide bags, and rub around with the olive oil to evenly coat the pork tenderloins. Seal bags via vacuum sealer or water displacement technique.
  4. Place bags in a sous vide water bath at 135°F for 3 hours.
  5. Pat the pork tenderloin dry and brush off the majority of the herbs. Heat a skillet over high heat until the vegetable oil starts to shimmer and just barely smoke, then add the pork tenderloin, laying it into the pan away from you to prevent painful spatters. Let the pork sit until it easily moves (it will release naturally when a good sear has formed), then flip it and repeat.
  6. Once you've seared all sides of the meat, transfer it to a platter, cover with foil, and rest for 10 minutes before slicing and serving.

 

{ 3 comments… add one }
  • SallyBR May 27, 2015, 6:40 pm

    Not a problem with me, I love pork tenderloin cooked sous vide, and intend to try your brining method soon –

    the brining I’ve used is too simple, I guess, just water salt and sugar – I know that pumping up the way you did it and increasing the brining time will make the meat much more flavorful

    keep those sous vide coming! 😉

    Reply
  • Reed F. July 22, 2016, 12:07 pm

    Following a recipe is important if you want to get the results you’re looking for…too much or too little of any ingredient can give you results you may not be happy with…

    Are we to guess how much honey to add to this recipe?

    Reply
    • Cooking Madly August 15, 2016, 3:12 pm

      Sorry, 1/3 cup. I’ll add it to the recipe.

      Reply

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